End of Story


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The 6 basic endings

Also, re-read something by Stephen King. Continue to reflect. Lesson three. Lesson four.

Making Ends Meet: How to Write a Good Ending to a Story

Never do this, although I have found a good pair of bolt-cutters to be a surprisingly useful tool, even outside prison. So if you take these lessons to heart, reading this book will not have been a waste of time, but if you re-read Lessons one through four, above, you might be able to use the time in other ways. Jan 09, Lori rated it really liked it Shelves: january. I got such a kick out of this book. Ivy Seidel is a writer. And honestly, we quickly realize she's not very good. In fact, she's not all that smart. But Abrahams lets us come to both conclusions on our own.

Still, though, she's likable. And even though you can see her disastrous decisions coming from the instant she starts teaching at a prison -- but not so far in advance as to be annoying -- you want her to take the wrong path. Because it's a hell of a lot more interesting than the right one. Nov 12, Shiela rated it it was ok Shelves: suspense , mystery. Bar tender by night, struggling writer Ivy Seidel wants nothing more than for her stories to be published. To help her gain depth and darkness in her work, she agrees to teach a writing class to a group of inmates in a high security prison.

In the midst of pandemonium and murder, Ivy encounters inmate Vance Harrow, a man who possesses great literary promise. As her relationship with the inmate becomes more involved, Ivy becomes convinced that Vance pleaded guilty to a crime he never committed. S Bar tender by night, struggling writer Ivy Seidel wants nothing more than for her stories to be published. She soon becomes obsessed to learn his true motivations. After a strong, captivating start, the story took a turn for the worse and I was actually glad when the novel ended.

Not sure why, but there it is.


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Sep 16, Gail rated it really liked it. Though this was somewhat of a slow read I love it when an author actually surprises me and doesn't take the easy way out, tying up all loose ends and "saving" the main character. Characters were believable Sure, she was a little direction-less, but she was smart and independent, and not your typical damsel in distress type. And it was a little first-season-of-Prison-Break-esque cue Michael Scofield fantasies. All good things. Then view spoiler [Abrahams turned her into your classically stupid, blinded by love idiot.

Not to mention that the plot turns completely ridiculous, including Ivy single-handedly breaking Vance out of a hospital and then them hiding out in the woods in the middle of winter for several days. Oh, and a shoot-out. And I think there was someone buried in a basement somewhere, too.

All in all, can't say I'd recommend this one. Totally frustrating, because I really was enjoying it up until the last fourth of the book. Oct 23, Maureen Sharon rated it really liked it. Per other reviews, many readers have identifies this novel as having a weak main character that seems to lose credibility as the plot continues. I found it intriguing for a completely different reason. As a former teacher with students exhibiting severe behavioral challenges I continually identified with the inmates in the novel and saw terrifying connections between them and my struggling students.

It refocused me on how I worked with them and for that reason I chose 4 stars. Fiction has a way Per other reviews, many readers have identifies this novel as having a weak main character that seems to lose credibility as the plot continues. Fiction has a way of changing lives in unintentional manners.

Jan 24, Laura rated it really liked it Shelves: mount-tbr I fell in love with Peter Abrahams about 15 years ago. Each book was better than the last. Somewhere along the way, I lost track of him. And at some point he started writing for kids. Jul 09, Jim Thomsen rated it it was amazing.

Peter Abrahams delivers yet another lean, mean, hairpin-corner thrill ride Main character Ivy is an everywoman, not especially ide Wow! Main character Ivy is an everywoman, not especially idealized, a person who isn't dumb but does some dumb things for smart reasons.

That's one key, actually. The other is the crisp confidence with which Abrahams writes.


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  • End of Story;
  • There's no self-conscious prose here, no slowing down the story for even a second to explain things. As in his other novels, Abrahams simply grabs you by the arm, takes you on a fifth-gear wild ride through the city and country, and explains things as he goes — and if you're fast enough to keep up, you will. If you're not, you won't. As Ivy comes to learn in her own growth as a writer, the reader never feels like he or she is going uphill in this book.

    One read of "End Of Story," or almost any other Abrahams book, will make clear exactly what that means. It also helps that the plotting in Abrahams' book is airtight. Everything makes perfect sense as it unfolds, even as key elements to every revelation are kept tucked back in the shadows as later surprises.

    The reader comes to see, as Ivy does, how Vance Harrow could be innocent of the upstate New York casino holdup that kills a security guard and two cohorts. And the smart reader is also allowed to see how there could be a little more to the story than a simple frame-up. Or even a lot more.

    And how Ivy may not know what she thinks she knows, even if she knows most of it. The moral of this story: Nobody knows as much as they think they do. And thinking otherwise could damn well get you killed. I'm dinging this book a half-star, because I've read just three Abrahams books, and in two of them he employs the same surprise device of making the innocent person a lot less innocent than he or she appears to be at the very end. Because I'd read another Abrahams book with a similar character, I found myself expecting the same surprise, hoping it wouldn't happen But that was a small imperfection in an otherwise perfect all-meat, no-fat story.

    A lot of genre authors, too obsessed with establishing their voices or following the dictates of their craft, forget to lend equal measures of speed and soul to their suspense tales. Not Abrahams, who rips with calm confidence through a ripping yarn that cheerfully tosses overboard anything that isn't pure exhilarating story. I can't wait to work my way through the rest of Abrahams' considerable oeuvre.

    Mar 04, Monique rated it it was ok Shelves: anticipation-suspense-novels. Eh, disappointing read for my twentieth this year, sigh where is my touch for finding the gems I need and love to read! So far a truly bleak start to my year-heads up friends I WILL read something great soon-but this wasn't it.. I have read this author before with his novel The Tutor and I wasn't really the biggest fan of that book either after rereading that review LOL but I tried this one sight and review unseen and tried really tried to get into this but it got super unbelievable and I did not Eh, disappointing read for my twentieth this year, sigh where is my touch for finding the gems I need and love to read!

    I have read this author before with his novel The Tutor and I wasn't really the biggest fan of that book either after rereading that review LOL but I tried this one sight and review unseen and tried really tried to get into this but it got super unbelievable and I did not have a good time at all.. So here is the story of Ivy Seidel a wannabe writer who has never been published, has nothing of note written and no qualifications to teach writing except for a Master's degree but nonetheless she gets a fluke job "teaching" inmates at a local prison when her friend leaves without an interview or anything and so she teaches a small class of felons despite her inexperience and inability to creatively write herself she reads the work of a Vince Harrow a criminal serving time for a casino robbery and she becomes intrigued..

    Now the real story would have been if she stole his work and passed it off as her own or if she did something else interesting instead she cant believe he wasn't college educated and attracted, curious and envious she decides to investigate him, the robbery he was locked up for and anybody who ever knew the guy from his high school football buddies to his girlfriend's sister.. It was too much and what was crazier is everyone from the people she ran up and called on to the police went along with her, cooperated with information and indulged this silly girl with no writing experience with her made up reasons of writing a fiction novel..

    Not to diss her but really who was she that she got so close to everything and "solves" the robbery murder by herself.. I don't know I lost the book and my interest waned after like page but it started okay if you suspend your reality and go with her improbable job and insane fixation with this criminal who writes better than her..

    I don't know I did not enjoy and as this is my second foray in Abramson's works I may try again later later in life but eh not a favorite and not impressed with this at all. Feb 02, Christie rated it really liked it Shelves: favourite-books. I cut my teeth on mystery novels when I was about eight. Every gift-giving occasion, my uncle would give me two brand new Bobbsey Twin books- hard covers.

    6 Clever Ways To Achieve The Perfect Ending To Your Story

    I loved following Bert and Nan, Flossie and Freddie as they solved mysteries in and around their home town, Lakeport. My daughter has those books I managed to save through numerous moves. Anyway - I still love a good mystery and I finished a new one this morning. End of Story is a great book…but not just because EW said so. This is a great book because it pays attention to details, transcends crime-story cliches and delivers characters that are cunning, charismatic, naive. End of Story tells the compelling tale of Ivy Siedel, an aspiring writer, who takes a job teaching writing to a small group of inmates at Dannemora Prison, in Upstate New York.

    When one of her students, Vance Harrow, turns out to be a talented writer, Ivy decides to take a closer look at his history and discovers something about him that both shocks and excites her…and changes her life forever. I read the book over the course of two days. Along the way Abrahams makes some interesting observations about writing and the process of doing it.

    A good suspense novel, full of ambition, bold moves, and a hunger for more. I was interested right from the start, partially because of the story itself, but partly because the novel is so well-written the reader cannot help but jump right in. I wish that I could say this book is the start of the series, because the end of the book has as much suspense as the middle, and I'm dying to know what happens at the end. I believe, though, that the best authors do that, make you think long after the book is over, wondering what happened after all. Feb 16, Dev Adams rated it did not like it.

    This book came as a recommendation from my library's book club. I've always enjoyed reading suspense novels and I appreciated that this one featured a female lead character. Then, I read it. The entire book has a strange, duck-footed pacing just like one of the characters that I found completely off-putting. The author also chooses to insert strangely worded sentences into the book in such a way that feels forced and pretentious. To call this novel suspenseful would be doing suspense as a genre a This book came as a recommendation from my library's book club.

    To call this novel suspenseful would be doing suspense as a genre a discredit. From the heroine's first visit to Dannemora, the intelligent reader can gain a grasp on where the author is going. There are too many coincidences, too many obviously fallacies. The only surprise was the very, very end, but it was far too little, too late. This is the second "innocent prisoner" book I have read this year, and the other, The Woodcutter, is so far superior as to be in a completely different universe.

    Oct 19, Marc rated it it was amazing. Peter Abrahams' plots are the opposite of "high-concept. Abrahams' characters--his minor characters as well as the protagonists--are vivid, memorable, and utterly believable. You know these people, and may be uncomfortably like them.

    He Peter Abrahams' plots are the opposite of "high-concept. He is especially adept at evoking a milieu--the violence and paranoia of prison life, the shabby working-class towns in New York State's North Country--with a few deft strokes. Abrahams' prose is careful and spare--not self-consciously "minimalist," but pared down to what is precisely necessary.

    Highest recommendation. Jan 27, Crystal Craig rated it liked it Shelves: , owned-print. I was some what disappointed with this book. The synopsis sucked me right in. I thought the idea of a young women going into a prison to teach criminals how to write was a interesting plot idea. I figured it would be the perfect backdrop for some mysterious, rather shady, well-written characters. I was wrong. The characters had about as much depth as the shallow end of a swimming pool made for ants. Having said that, it wasn't all bad. There was something that kept me intrigued; the charming and I was some what disappointed with this book.

    There was something that kept me intrigued; the charming and talented, Harrow.

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    The more Ivy uncovered about him, the more I wanted to know. I was sort of surprised by it; just that it wasn't a happy one. View 1 comment. Dec 14, Karen rated it really liked it Shelves: sweeter-reads. End of Story More is what I want at the end of this book but there is no more, it's the end of the story. This story follows Ivy's life, a boring, non-published bartender. When her best friend moves away he hands her his teaching job at the prison. Then Ivy's life takes off. She taking chances and doing things in order to free an innocent man Or is she writing her own best seller.

    Peter Abrahams did a fantastic job End of Story Peter Abrahams did a fantastic job weaving Ivy's story around the theme of writing. Feb 28, Claudia rated it liked it. I found this book very interesting. Specially because, from the very beginning Ivy - the main character - starts taking all the paths I would have never chosen to take. And I keep wondering: Will she be able to pull it off in the end? That feeling kept the pages easily turning.

    The very end of the story came somewhat as a surprise but I'd say I enjoyed it, in twisted way I will give this author another try even though he is categorized as mystery writer, which is not my favorite genre "End of I found this book very interesting. I will give this author another try even though he is categorized as mystery writer, which is not my favorite genre "End of Story" was not what I call a mystery Jan 05, Mary Fleming rated it liked it. Just discovered this writer thanks to Stephen King.

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    Fast paced and suspenseful, an exciting read with lots of twists. Didnt care for the setting. Will definitely read more by him. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. At first, I was a bit skeptical about this book. I had chosen it as an experiment to see how borrowing e-books worked from my local library and how to get them on my Kindle.

    I went to the last page of e-book selections, and this was the first one on the last page. With that alone, I was thinking that maybe this book wasn't going to be the best. Why else would it be on the last page of e-books? So I decided to actually At first, I was a bit skeptical about this book. So I decided to actually read the book that I was using to learn the ropes of borrowing books.

    First off, it was hard for me to get a read on the main character, Ivy. At moments, she seemed very smart and capable, if not just lacking some real confidence in herself and her ability. But towards the end of the book, I couldn't help but think that maybe she had hit her head, and had brain damage because her actions just made absolutely no sense. Overall, it seemed that Ivy was lost. That is in no way a bad thing, but I do think it helped contribute to her VERY questionable actions towards the latter third of the book. The struggle to stabilize an object a poetic line in a foreign language; a silhouette glimpsed through a window intensifies its instability, leaving it blurred beyond recognition.

    Instead, every attempt at explanation merely exacerbates the mystery. At first, I would only sit in a chair picking hair and dust off my clothes, and then get up and stretch and sit down again. In the morning I drank coffee and smoked. In the evening I drank tea and smoked and went to the window and back and from one room into the next room. The peculiar coloring of such descriptions—minimal, muted, but numinously so, as if touched by the aura of all the events they leave unregistered—resembles the silence that fills the air after the voicing of a question.

    So the problem is not simply that we cannot recapture our lost loves; rather, it is that reality itself is unresolved and radically answerless. The End of the Story plays out against such a background of answerlessness, balancing as if above an abyss. I need to put more order into what I remember. The order is difficult. It has been the most difficult thing about this book. I have tried to find a good order, but my thoughts are not orderly—one is interrupted by another, or one contradicts another, and in addition to that, my memories are quite often false, confused, abbreviated, or collapsed into one another.

    She is, in this sense, inseparable from her sadness, which is instinctive and internal—her heartbreak is part of her, rather than part of the world. Of course, her frequent metafictional reflections where she self-consciously frets over the shape of the story disrupt our suspension of disbelief, and press against the prospect of order. More importantly, though, they remind us that what we are reading is not the thing itself but the thought; that the book follows the faulty logic of memory formation, leaving its fabric full of rifts and ripples.

    And, as always, it is the accidental aspects of memory that prove the most painful—those tiny cracks and inaccuracies that increase the distance between us and what we want to recall. By the front wall he lifted a stem of thorns that hung down from an overgrown climbing rose so that I could pass without scratching myself. Or it was that night, but the night was not entirely dark. In fact, it is only dark in my memory of that particular night, because I know there were two bright streetlamps nearby: one of them shone into my room. If it is dark in her memory, this may be because memory always darkens its objects, slowly corroding their reality and replacing them with simulacra.

    Here, however, there is only one face, one consciousness, isolated and delimited. Accordingly, The End of the Story seems to assume the form of a firmly closed circle. The narrative maps the outlines of a mind whose contents, despite their dissimilar surfaces, are crystallized from a single substance. Moreover, this structure mirrors the fact that we know, from the start, that the romance is over—making its end a prerequisite of its beginning.

    https://inmaholtosound.tk After he left me, the beginning was not only the first, happy occasion; it also contained the end, as though the very air of that room where we sat together, in that public place, where he leaned over, barely knowing me, and whispered to me, were already permeated with the end of it, as though the walls of that room were already made of the end of it.

    Nonetheless, in itself, it is of no obvious purpose. Such insignificant interludes might make up much of a typical novel, though they are what go most unnoticed. In this sense, the narrator selects the scene almost arbitrarily, purely to put an end to something endless. But beyond its immediate effect, this deliberately inadequate ending also evinces something deeper. In this way, the written work retains an internal relation to an idealized, unwritten other:. But by then I will not be able to go back and change it, so the novel will remain what it is and the other novel, the one that should have been written, will never be written.

    The binary is not taxonomical but conceptual; the push and pull between these two poles shapes the production of literary works.


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